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Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version) DVD Region 3

Jet Li (Actor) | Nakamura Shido (Actor) | Harada Masato (Actor) | Collin Chou (Actor)
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Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version)
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Customer Rating: Customer Review Rated Bad 7 - 7.9 out of 10 (14)
All Editions Rating: Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8.3 out of 10 (26)

YesAsia Editorial Description

Fearless is rumored to be superstar Jet Li's last martial arts film. Even if it is not, the dynamic and breath-taking action sequences alone already provide a good reason to watch it. The movie also features famous Japanese actor Nakamura Shidou (Be With You), who will have some spectacular fighting scenes with Jet Li. Li also demonstrates top-notch martial arts when fighting with Thai Olympic boxing champion Somluck Kamsing and the 7' tall Australian wrestler Nathan Jones (Tom Yum Goong). Director Ronny Yu (Freddy vs. Jason) and action choreographer Yuen Woo Ping (The Matrix), who have both become hot properties in Hollywood in recent years, join forces to offer a film which will not disappoint action movie fans for sure.

Fearless follows the life of Huo Yuanjia (1867-1909), founder of the Jing Wu Sports Federation. Apart from the gripping plot, partly historical and partly fabricated, the film also demonstrates great creativity in its action scenes. Rarely does a movie show contests between Chinese Kung-fu and Japanese Judo or Thai boxing, but Fearless will show you all these, with every scene carefully choreographed. The film's exploration into the spirit underlying Chinese martial arts, which is as significant as the stunning actions, distinguishes Fearless from ordinary kung fu movies. Jet Li will show fans the real meaning of Chinese martial arts, and why true heroes are Fearless.

The Region 3 Edko DVD release of Fearless DOES NOT contain English subtitles, as the film has yet to play theatrically in all English-speaking territories. Still, while the absence of English Subtitles is disappointing, Jet Li's star presence and Yuen Woo-Ping's dynamic action choreography require no translation whatsoever.

Click here for Fearless official website.

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Technical Information

Product Title: Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version) 霍元甲 (DTS版) (香港版) 霍元甲 (DTS版) (香港版) SPIRIT - スピリット - (霍元甲)(香港版) Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version)
Artist Name(s): Jet Li (Actor) | Nakamura Shido (Actor) | Harada Masato (Actor) | Collin Chou (Actor) | Dong Yong (Actor) | Betty Sun (Actor) | Nathan Jones (Actor) 李 連杰 (Actor) | 中村 獅童 (Actor) | 原田真人 (Actor) | 鄒 兆龍 (Actor) | 董勇 (Actor) | 孫儷 (Actor) | 尼芬鍾斯 (Actor) 李 连杰 (Actor) | 中村 狮童 (Actor) | 原田真人 (Actor) | 邹 兆龙 (Actor) | 董勇 (Actor) | 孙俪 (Actor) | 尼芬 锺斯 (Actor) 李連杰(ジェット・リー) (Actor) | 中村 獅童 (Actor) | 原田真人 (Actor) | 鄒兆龍(コリン・チョウ) (Actor) | 董勇(ドン・ヨン) (Actor) | 孫儷(スン・リー) (Actor) | ネイサン・ジョーンズ (Actor) 이연걸 (Actor) | Nakamura Shido (Actor) | Harada Masato (Actor) | Collin Chou (Actor) | Dong Yong (Actor) | Betty Sun (Actor) | Nathan Jones (Actor)
Director: Ronny Yu 于仁泰 于仁泰 于仁泰(ロニー・ユー) Ronny Yu
Action Director: Yuen Woo Ping 袁和平 袁和平 袁和平(ユエン・ウーピン) Yuen Woo Ping
Release Date: 2006-03-13
Language: Cantonese, Mandarin
Subtitles: Traditional Chinese
Country of Origin: Hong Kong
Picture Format: NTSC What is it?
Aspect Ratio: 1.78 : 1
Sound Information: Dolby Digital EX(TM) / THX Surround EX(TM), DTS Extended Surround(TM) / DTS-ES(TM)
Disc Format(s): DVD-9, DVD
Region Code: 3 - South East Asia (including Hong Kong, S. Korea and Taiwan) What is it?
Rating: IIB
Duration: 104 (mins)
Publisher: Edko Films Ltd. (HK)
Package Weight: 90 (g)
Shipment Unit: 1 What is it?
YesAsia Catalog No.: 1004135852

Product Information

* Screen Format: 16:9
* Sound Mix:
- Cantonese: Dolby Digital Surround EX
- Mandarin: DTS ES, Dolby Digital Surround EX
* DVD Type : DVD-9
* Extras:
- 製作特輯 Making Of
- 電影預告 Movie Trailer
- 電視廣告 TV Advertisement
- 導演及員介紹 Introducing Cast & Director
- 相片集 Photo Gallery

導演:于仁泰
Director: Ronny Yu

這是一個關於精武門創辦人──中國一代武術宗師霍元甲的故事。

霍元甲自小醉心武術,但其父不想孩子成為一介武夫,遂不讓他習武。元甲與玩伴農敬蓀偷偷抄錄霍家拳譜天天苦練,終以稚嫩的霍家拳打敗小惡霸,自此信心大增。憑著對武術的悟性及熱情,武藝根基日益深厚,後來成為天津赫赫有名的武師。但卻因鋒芒太露好勝心強,性格變得浮躁傲慢,人也越來越好勇鬥狠。

元甲徒弟被天津另一高手秦爺重創,他不問原由闖入秦爺的壽宴,威逼秦爺當場簽生死狀與他比武。最終,雖然元甲得勝,但卻因此賠上了他一生最愛的兩個人──母親及女兒的性命!大錯一手鑄成,痛不欲生的霍元甲神志昏亂,遂遠走他方。隱姓埋名棲身於一個偏遠的村落,並得村民孫婆婆及失明少女月慈照顧收留。與世無爭的農村生活,溫厚善良的村民令萬念俱灰的元甲漸忘傷痛及仇恨,生命正慢慢復甦。

一天,村中小孩阿貴被隔壁的暹邏村人欺負,元甲為救阿貴,終於顯露身手與暹邏村的泰拳高手北查進行較量。經此一戰,他開始重拾對武術的意識及思考,創出流傳後世的迷縱拳,並決定返回天津。為自己及中國武術重新找回方向。

其時國內武師紛紛敗於西洋大力士奧比音手下,對方更揚言要橫掃東亞病夫,元甲於是趕往上海挑戰奧比音,並以自創的迷縱拳打敗巨人。外國商會代表擔心元甲會挑動民族情緒對抗外國勢力,便策劃一場四大外國高手挑戰霍元甲的比賽以挫其銳氣。元甲知道是時候發揮「自強不息」的精武精神,故不理好友農勁蓀的反對接受挑戰。比賽當日,他連續擊敗英國拳王、西班牙劍客與普魯士長矛高手。最後日本高手田中安野上場,這是列強策動這一場世紀之戰的最後一粒棋子,也是最厲害的棋子,但見擂臺上兩人屏息對峙,台下四方鴉雀無聲,千萬個拳頭緊握著,千萬雙眼睛只盯著同一個方向……

一九一○年九月十四日,沒有人可以忘記這一天。

For as long as he could remember, HUO wanted to learn martial arts. His FATHER was a great fighter, but he did not want his son to follow in his footsteps and refused to teach the boy. This only made Huo even more determined to learn. With the help of his friend, NONG, Huo stole his father's Wushu manual and sets out to teach himself how to fight.

Soon, Huo is able to beat up a schoolyard bully with his new skills. Thrilled by the taste of this small victory, Huo throws himself into training and as the years pass, fight followed fight and victory followed victory until he became known as a skilled and powerful fighter. But as his fame grew, so did his pride. Huo had become an arrogant hothead who was always spoiling for a fight.

When one of Huo's young apprentices is injured by a master named CHIN, Huo is full of vengeful spite and indignation. He forces Chin to fight him, and kills him with no remorse. Only when he returns home does Huo discover that his victory has cost him the lives of the two people he loves most - his mother and his daughter were killed in brutal revenge.

Crazed with grief and shame, Huo flees Tianjin. He wanders for thousands of miles, no longer caring whether he lives or dies. But just as he is ready to give up all hope, he is saved by GRANDMA SUN and her blind granddaughter, MOON, who bring him back to the idyllic village where they live. Guided by their simple kindness and generosity, Huo - who felt he had nothing to live for - slowly began to forget his pain and his desire to fight.

One day, a child from the village runs into trouble with a neighboring Siamese tribe. In order to save the boy, Huo reluctantly parries blows from a powerful Thai boxer named BEI CHA. The encounter reawakened Huo's love of martial arts and he began to experiment with a lighter, less aggressive style that would eventually become the legendary Mizong (Missing) Fist. Huo realized that the future of martial arts lay in the spirit of sportsmanship and not brutality. At last, he has found his place in the world, and he knew that he had to return to Tianjin so that he could do the same for Chinese martial arts.

Back in Tianjin, an American strongman named O'BRIEN is making headlines by defeating China's fighters and dismissing them as 'Sick men of the East'. Huo challenges the hulking wrestler, and beats him easily with his graceful Missing Fist. This startles members of the Foreign Chambers of Commerce, who worry that Huo's victory would fan the flames of anti-Western sentiment in the Chinese people. They hatch a plan to humiliate Huo by pitching him against four fighters representing the four major foreign powers in China. Huo's childhood friend, Nong, suspects a trap, but Huo sees this as a good opportunity to demonstrate the spirit of sportsmanship.

The battle of the century begins! A British boxer, a Spanish swordsman, a Belgian soldier - three formidable fighters step into the ring, and one after another, Huo defeats them all. But the Chamber of Commerce has been saving the best until last. The Japanese challenger, ANNO TANAKA is by far the most skilled competitor. As the two men stand face to face in the arena, the thousand-strong audience waits with baited breath.

What happened that day in September, 1910, is something that nobody would ever forget.

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YumCha! Asian Entertainment Reviews and Features

Professional Review of "Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version)"

View Professional Review:
February 22, 2007

This professional review refers to Fearless (2006) (DVD) (Director's Cut) (Hong Kong Version)
Young Huo Yuanjia was an arrogant fighter who was always spoiling for a fight. On the same day he became the best fighter in Tianjin, he lost his mother and daughter. Crazed with grief and shame, Huo Yuanjia fled Tianjin stumbling upon an idyllic village. Guided by the villagers' simple kindness and generosity, Huo Yuanjia began to forget his pain and his desire to fight. At last, he makes his peace with the world and decides to return home.

Back in Tianjin, an American wrestler is making headlines by defeating China's fighters and dismissing them as "Sick Men of the East". Huo Yuanjia beats the hulking wrestler easily with his graceful martial arts. This startles members of the foreign chamber of commerce, who worry that Huo Yuanjia's victory would fan the flames of anti-western sentiment in the Chinese people...

Jet Li's last wushu/martial arts film is a fine tribute to the underlying spirit of Chinese martial arts that Huo Yuanjia fought and ultimately died for. And now, being able to see this stunning martial arts film in its fullest version, a version director Ronny Yu never thought would get released, just adds to the richness of the story and further fleshes out one of Chinas great folk heroes. Not content with just adding more action sequences the extra footage also adds more dramatic moments where we witness Huo Yuanjia nurture his pain and suffering from his losses and then emerge with his newfound philosophy about life and martial arts.

The narrative structure of the film is also reworked and scenes are moved around to create a film that flows better. Though, I will admit that I can understand why Michelle Yeoh's scene was cut from theatrical versions of the film. It pains me to say it. I am madly in love with her but her scene really does nothing more than set up the story as a historical tale rather than a narration. Does that make sense? Her scene takes place in our current day and she is presenting a bid to make wushu an event at the Olympic Games in Beijing. The scene does little except explain the meaning of wushu and then painfully ends with, "The answer lies over one hundred years in the past… beginning with one man…", thus setting up our story. Michelle, I love you, but your scene doesn't jive with this turkey.

The rest of the additional scenes do more to develop the character of Huo Yuanjia. Especially, I felt, during his stay in the rice farming village with Moon. There are more scenes that emphasize their growing relationship with each other and an additional scene concerning another tribe that begins to display Huo Yuanjia's sacrifice of self and his growing realization of his new nature and character. Huo Yuanjia has to find peace in his life and here we witness the beginning of that growth.

There were of course questions if Jet Li could still bring it to the ring in his early 40s. The answer of course is yes. Hell yes. He and Yuen Woo-ping once again prove their formidability with fantastic set pieces that continue to raise the bar. While there wasn't that moment of mind blowing creativity that makes you yell out by yourself in front of the screen, the action in Fearless is still second to none. It may lack the ferocity and finality of their previous work in Fist of Legend but the sequences still thrill and entertain and only get better as the movie progresses. Over the 100 days of filming, 60 were devoted to the action sequences. That is time well spent if you ask me.

This Director's Cut of Fearless is a much needed upgrade for the Jet Li fan. There is enough action in it to please your bloodlust but there is also an impressive amount of time devoted to character development and equal time for Jet Li to display his also worthy acting skills. The man is a terrifying set of limbs powered by an enormous heart. And it is this heart that drives Fearless and what raises it above simplistic action movies of the day. And perhaps I am one of the few westerner viewers who, despite Fearless' nationalistic fervor, was moved to tears at the end of film with Huo Yuanjia's passing and the swelling of pride in the Chinese people.

Up to this day I had only watched the western domestic release of Fearless. That will forever collect dust on the wall of DVDs. The Director's Cut demands multiple viewings to catch everything that wasn't in the former mentioned release.

by Mack - Twitchfilm.net

March 13, 2006

This professional review refers to Fearless (DTS Version) (DVD+4pcs A3 Poster) (Hong Kong Version)
Fearless has been one of the most talked about martial arts films in years for a number of reasons, not least because of the announcement by Jet Li that it would be his last 'wushu' outing. Adding to the ensuing storm of publicity was the editing out of around forty minutes, which removed Michelle Yeoh's role entirely, and the fact that the family of Huo Yuan Jia publicly voiced their anger at the manner in which the legendary figure has been portrayed in the film. Interestingly, Fearless also marks the return to Hong Kong of director Ronny Yu, best known for his Bride with White Hair films, and who has been working in Hollywood for several years now, mostly on decidedly low brow horror fare such as Freddy vs. Jason.

Beyond this complicated state of affairs lies a worthwhile film, one which sees a most welcome move away from the CGI enhanced flying combat which has become so common of late. Fearless is very much an old fashioned film, based around honest heroism and righteousness and largely freed from the philosophical shoe gazing of Zhang Yimou or the wacky excesses of Tsui Hark, which have sadly come to typify the modern genre.

The film follows the life of Huo Yuan Jia (Jet Li), national hero and founder of the Jing Wu Sports Federation. Beginning with his early years of training in Tianjin and culminating in 1910 with an epic battle against four fighters who represent the foreign powers vying for control of China at the time. As such, the plot is nothing new, and plays faithfully to the template set down by countless Shaw Brothers films. Cocky, young fighter pursues fame and victory, discovers the tragic price of glory, hides out in the country, learns the spiritual side of beating people up, returns to face his enemies and confront his inner demons.

Although Fearless does gain some points for being based on actual events, however loosely, it nevertheless carries little dramatic weight. It has an highly predictable narrative that illustrates quite neatly why Li has chosen to move away from such roles. This is a criticism aimed at the vast majority of genre films and, whilst offering nothing new, Fearless at least tells the traditional tale with a good amount of heart. Though it gives little genuine insight into its central protagonist, it makes for inspirational and unexpectedly moving viewing. For what is essentially a well-paced, action-packed crowd pleaser, it is difficult to see whether the sizable portion of the film that was removed would have improved matters.

Director Yu thankfully shows a steadier hand here than he has of late, and manages to balance the different aspects of the film very well. Although much of the narrative is concerned with tragedy and oppression, Yu manages to work in a number of lighthearted touches, some of which are quite amusing. Visually, Fearless is a handsome affair, with some wonderfully ornate sets and gorgeous scenery providing the proceedings with a sure sense of place.

The film's main strength is its awesome fight scenes, expertly choreographed by genre master Yuen Woo Ping. The frequent battles are breathtaking, fast, and strangely elegant despite being filled with snapping limbs and spraying blood. Although at times slightly marred by gimmicky set ups, these moments lend the film a brutal air of realism that has been lacking in the genre. The action scenes dominate the film and make up for a fair amount of its running time, which is a definite bonus for Western viewers worried about the lack of English subtitles.

Although it may have its faults, and is at times a little hard to take seriously, Fearless undeniably makes for great entertainment. Wearing its heart on its sleeve, with a sincere sense of both national and personal pride, it makes for a rousing experience likely to be enjoyed by all viewers.

Movie Grade: 4/5

By James Mudge - BeyondHollywood.com

March 9, 2006

This professional review refers to Fearless (DVD-9) (China Version)
This is apparently to be Jet Li's final martial arts film, a fact that saddens the whole of martial arts fandom. So there was a lot riding on this one: would Jet the martial artist go out with a bang, or with a whimper?

Well, fortunately for all of us, it's a definite bang. Jet, now in his mid-forties, may have slowed down a little, but he's still got the effortless grace and balance that made him a star. Watching this man move is almost a religious experience: as an admiring character in Blake's 7 once said, "Every part a moving part? Every move is executed beautifully, and every move is just as much as required, but not one hair's breadth more. Pure poetry."

Of course, we've seen from Jet's Hollywood movies that, no matter how great his skill, it's still possible to make it look like a dog's breakfast with poor direction and/or action choreography. Fortunately again, Jet's final martial arts film is graced by two masters in this field, in the form of Yuen Wo Ping (choreography) and Ronny Yu (direction). Yuen's fame has survived Hollywood, and he's known worldwide as the action choreographer of films such as The Matrix and Ang Lee's epic Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Yu fared a little worse in Hollywood, being relegated to teen slasher movies, but he's responsible for the Michael Hui comedy Chicken And Duck Talk, as well as the sublime wuxia fantasy The Bride With White Hair, so his credentials are solid.

And with three such masters in control, it wouldn't have been possible to bollix this up even if they'd all painted themselves purple and done the Chicken Dance. So what we see is a beautifully realized colonial China, with Jet as the jewel and centerpiece. Admittedly, he's not so appealing in the early part of the film, as the prideful and truculent scrapper: he's a trifle too old now to get away with that, and the character is less appealing than the endearingly boyish scrapper he played in Fong Sai Yuk.

But where Jet really shines is the second half of the film. He gives this role the gravitas that marked his turn in the Once Upon A Time In China series, and turns in a finely nuanced performance that compliments the fighting.

And the fighting is glorious. Oh, have I already mentioned that? Well, it deserves mentioning again. And again. And again. The film opens with Huo's contest against three foreign champions, which is such a gem of classic martial arts cinema as will bring tears to the eyes of enthusiasts. Jet demonstrates his mastery of several weapons of the traditional Chinese armory, and Yu and Yuen choreograph and film thoroughly credible fights in a spare elegant manner which shows off the skill of the participants.

One thing I haven't mentioned yet is the subtitles. There aren't any, I believe because it was a condition of the US distributor that the Hong Kong release had no English subs. So I was a little apprehensive going in. But, perhaps unsurprisingly, it didn't really make a bean of difference. The story is simple and clear enough without dialogue translations, and although there were a few subtleties in conversations that I missed, overall I had no difficulty following the plot. In fact, the lack of subtitles left me free to appreciate the soft beauty of the Mandarin language, as well as Jet's more mature performance.

So if the world of martial arts cinema absolutely has to lose Jet Li, this is a fine and fitting film to go out with.

8.5 three-section staffs out of 10

Review by Alison Jobling - heroic-cinema.com

February 21, 2006

After much anticipation the recently released Hong Kong DVD of Fearless - the film Jet Li claims will be his final wushu picture - has passed into my greedy hands. I hesitate to call what follows here a 'review' per se, since I have none of the needed language skills and the DVD does not include English subtitles. Yes, I ran a review of Tom Yum Goong in similar circumstances but this film - unlike that one - actually features a plot and some performances that go beyond the butt whoopin'. So what you're getting is by no means a complete review, but a collection of my impressions of the film.

First question: can Ronnie Yu and Jet Li still bring it old school style? Oh, yes. Yes, they can. The film is beautifully shot and with the exception of the improved effects could very easily have been a product of Hong Kong's golden age. It's been a while since Hong Kong made a film like this - overtly political, nostalgic, set in colonial times, etc - and this is a good one. I don't believe that it cracks Li's top tier of films and it will be a very hard sell to mainstream US audiences - more on that in a bit - but it is very, very good.

First, the quibbles, and there are a few.

Jet is getting old. At forty-three he's not over the hill yet but he is beginning to show his age and this impacts things in a few areas. I have never enjoyed Li in 'goofy young master mode' and that is intensely the case here. When it comes to physical comedy Li is no Stephen Chow, and never has been, but he just looks silly when playing the young version of Huo Yuan Jia for laughs in the early going. Not only is he obviously far older than the character he is playing at this point, but his version of youth consists too much of stumbling about and mugging for the camera. Thankfully this phase is over quickly and Li's undeniable screen presence begins to shine through once he is allowed to tap into the impatience, anger, and tragedy of the character.

More important to the martial arts fans out there, Li is visibly beginning to slow down. He is nowhere close to being over the hill yet, but he has definitely crested the peak. The fights are still spectacular, but if you were to compare this film side by side with Fist of Legend - an interesting project considering the interlocked characters and Yuen Wu Ping's work on both as fight choreographer - it is clear that Li is no longer capable of things that once seemed to come effortlessly. Again, he is still one of the very best in the world but the decline, though slight, is apparent enough to make you wonder how much it played in to his decision to step back from wushu film.

On a related note, there is a surprising amount of technical trickery in the fight scenes, both in terms of wirework and altered film speeds, to goose things up a bit. While not nearly as intrusive as it is in many films the wires feel strangely out of place in a film that purports to be a straight-ahead biopic. Again, compared to the 'set up the cameras and let 'em fight' approach of Fist of Legend.

And finally - the good stuff is coming - there is the comment made earlier about Western prospects. Fearless is one of those films clearly made for a primary audience very well versed in the source material. Huo Yuan Jia is a legendary figure in China, one the filmmakers can be certain their entire primary audience will be well familiar with and that allows them to take certain shortcuts and press certain buttons that simply will not resonate the same way with less knowledgeable audiences. The political situation around the master's death seems largely taken for granted. The mid section of the film plays like a Cole's Notes primer on his life more than an in-depth drama, and it is very unlikely that audiences outside of China will appreciate the emotional crescendo of his death in nearly the same way that the Chinese would.

And now the good stuff.

Ronnie Yu is back. The Hong Kong A-lister dropped way down into the B - arguably even C - ranks when he made the move to Hollywood. It's been a long time since he had a high-end film to work on and he hasn't lost a step. His camera is nimble, the staging is excellent, and it's just fantastic to see the man behind The Bride With White Hair back doing what he does best. Yes, he kept Freddy Vs. Jason from sucking as bad as it could have, but is that enough to make up for his prolonged absence from martial arts films? Not by a long shot.

Production values are excellent, with full marks going to a stellar design team. The environments are richly realized and recapture the colonial feel of so many great Hong Kong classics. Is it a bad thing to be so happy to see a big ol' pair of muttonchops on a boorish Brit? I think not.

Li himself. I have said many times that I do not believe Li gets the credit he deserves as an actor and I stand by that statement again here. Yes, he has his limitations - see the above 'young master' comments - but the man has an undeniable screen presence and the ability to convey volumes while doing very little. Playing Huo Yuan Jia gives Li very large shoes to fill and he does an admirable job on the dramatic front.

And, finally, the fights themselves. Has the combination of Jet Li and Yuen Woo Ping ever failed to impress? Nope. And while their work here may not rise quite to the heights of their work together in Fist of Legend, there are many - myself among them - who consider that film one of the absolute untouchables of martial arts film. Their work in Fearless is inventive, engaging and breathtaking. Li faces up to a wide array of opponents, each with a unique fighting style and acquits himself very, very well. The Nathan Jones fight offered less than I would have hoped, but the sequences against a sword wielding Chinese master and British spear man and the final battle against a Japanese samurai are all top notch.

If Li holds true to his word and calls it a day on the wushu front with this one then, sad as it will be to see him go, he will at least be going out on a high note and on his own terms. I stop short of calling it a classic but it is very good.

By Todd Brown - Twitchfilm.net

Feature articles that mention "Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version)"

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Customer Review of "Fearless (DTS Version) (Hong Kong Version)"

Average Customer Rating for this Edition: Customer Review Rated Bad 7 - 7.9 out of 10 (14)
Average Customer Rating for All Editions of this Product: Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8.3 out of 10 (26)

Yasar
See all my reviews


June 14, 2009

This customer review refers to Fearless (2006) (DVD) (Director's Cut) (Hong Kong Version)
Great Movie Customer Review Rated Bad 10 - 10 out of 10
If you liked the 104 minutes version of Fearless then you are going to like the director's cut version(which is two hours and twenty one minutes long) even more.It is one of best film that Jet Li has been in since Once A Upon A time In China and Fist Of Legend.The film has a strong story,good acting and direction but the strenth in the movie is its awesome fight scenes and are very well choreographed by Yuen Woo Ping.

Worth buying.
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Kenshiro
See all my reviews


April 13, 2009

This customer review refers to Fearless (2006) (DVD) (Director's Cut) (Hong Kong Version)
1 people found this review helpful

period fu films with Jet = AAA Customer Review Rated Bad 10 - 10 out of 10
Jet Li is best cast when he is in period kung fu films. And if you add Yuen Woo Ping to make the action, well your getting what's best in the genre. This film and Ip ma are the two best recent period fu flix since fist of legend and Drunken master 2 ( witch both were released in 1994 ) It's been a long time!!!
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T-Man
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July 13, 2008

This customer review refers to Fearless (2006) (DVD) (Director's Cut) (US Version)
This is NOT the director's cut Customer Review Rated Bad 0 - 0 out of 10
Warning! The US DVD of Jet Li's "Fearless" is not the director's cut. Both discs are the exact same thing as the regular DVD out there, despite having such prints on the discs themselves. Wait until Universal Pictures has stated that they have fixed or is fixing the problem. Until then, don't buy this DVD.
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George
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February 24, 2008

This customer review refers to Fearless (2006) (DVD) (Director's Cut) (Hong Kong Version)
Jets finest hour..? Customer Review Rated Bad 10 - 10 out of 10
It could well be... Jet Li's last kung fu movie was the quote released with this instant classic (and we can all ignore that). Whether it was a trick to gain more promotion for Fearless, or not, it was far from needed to get people seated for this epic! Playing the master to his character in Fist Of Legend, Jet acts, moves and moves again in one of his finest performances ever. Beautifully directed by Ronny Yu, and featuring stunning choreography from the infamous Yuen Woo Ping, the directors cut of Fearless is an amazing piece of work! Even the original cut, which I first saw, blew me away... but with the DC, there's just something a little different that makes this version extra special. Own it, buy it, steal it, see it...
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Best Review
KingX
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July 27, 2007

This customer review refers to Fearless (2006) (DVD) (Director's Cut) (Hong Kong Version)
Wonderful Customer Review Rated Bad 9 - 9 out of 10
I have earlier made a reviews of the unrated edition of this film so I copy and paste that one into here with some add-ons only.

I'm so glad that after all these halfmade movies he's been given in Hollywood he finally gets a movie that he deserves.
Fearless is a film where we get to see Jet's skills in acting AND Martial Arts!
Wow, what a film this is!
The scens are beautfiul made which makes me think of the older ones such as Once Upon A Time In China 1,2,3 and others he made before he landed in hollywood.

The acting is on par with his performance in Danny The Dog (A movie I find very interesting and well played by Jet)

Jet has said this will be his last film that he gonna make using of the martial arts style Wushu, I don't know about that, but if this really is his last film of that kind it was a very very good "this is for you my fans" film.

Every move you have loved him for is here, evey "jet smile" is here it got it all!

What differs the directors cut with the other releases is a few new scenes that just helps this movie to build tention.
I wonder WHY movie companies shall butcher the directors visions of a film since most of the times those editions are the best ones.
This oen is no exepction. It helps to get a better picture on the character jet plays and also with this directors cut we get a little info. regarding wushu as a martial arts style and what its meaning is.

thx for all these yrs Jet Li! Good Luck with future film projects!
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