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Mad World (2017) (Blu-ray + OST) (Hong Kong Version) Blu-ray Region A

Eric Tsang (Actor) | Shawn Yue (Actor) | Elaine Jin (Actor) | Charmaine Fong (Actor)
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YesAsia Editorial Description

Realistically broaching the sensitive topic of mental health in Hong Kong society, Mad World has garnered a score of accolades, including Best New Director and Supporting Actor at the 53rd Golden Horse Awards, Best Director and Screenplay at the 23rd Hong Kong Film Critics Society Awards, and Best New Director, Supporting Actor and Supporting Actress at the 36th Hong Kong Film Awards. Shawn Yue delivers his best performance as a man struggling with bipolar disorder in the subtle humanist drama from first-time director Wong Chun. Eric Tsang and Elaine Jin co-star as his parents, who play significant roles in his journey of pain and healing.

Financial analyst Tung (Shawn Yue) endures constant stress and pressure from work, his fiancee (Charmaine Fong) and his bedridden mother (Elaine Jin) until, one day, he has a breakdown. After spending some time in a mental health institution, Tung is discharged into the care of his estranged father (Eric Tsang), a truck driver who lives in a single room in a subdivided flat. Tung's father is at a loss over how to help his son as he tries to be a good parent for the first time. Meanwhile, Tung wants to reintegrate into society, but society - be it old acquaintances, prospective employers or concerned neighbors - isn't exactly welcoming. Each day, he makes small steps, both forwards and backwards, as he struggles to cope with his illness and the circumstances of his mother's death.

This edition comes with the film soundtrack.

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Technical Information

Product Title: Mad World (2017) (Blu-ray + OST) (Hong Kong Version) 一念無明 (2017) (Blu-ray + 電影原聲大碟) (香港版) 一念无明 (2017) (Blu-ray + 电影原声大碟) (香港版) Mad World (2017) (Blu-ray + OST) (Hong Kong Version) Mad World (2017) (Blu-ray + OST) (Hong Kong Version)
Artist Name(s): Eric Tsang (Actor) | Shawn Yue (Actor) | Elaine Jin (Actor) | Charmaine Fong (Actor) | Ng Siu Hin (Actor) | Chen Bi De (Actor) | Bryant Mak (Actor) | Chen Xue Wen (Actor) | Shui Jie (Actor) | ZHANG YING | Yusuke Hatano 曾志偉 (Actor) | 余文樂 (Actor) | 金燕玲 (Actor) | 方皓玟 (Actor) | 吳 肇軒 (Actor) | 陳彼得 (Actor) | 麥子樂 (Actor) | 陳學文 (Actor) | 稅 潔 (Actor) | 張穎 | 波多野裕介 曾志伟 (Actor) | 余文乐 (Actor) | 金燕玲 (Actor) | 方皓玟 (Actor) | 吴 肇轩 (Actor) | 陈彼得 (Actor) | 麦子乐 (Actor) | 陈学文 (Actor) | 税 洁 (Actor) | 张颖 | 波多野裕介 曾志偉 (エリック・ツァン) (Actor) | 余文樂(ショーン・ユー) (Actor) | 金燕玲(イレイン・カム) (Actor) | 方皓玟 (カーメイン・フォン) (Actor) | Ng Siu Hin (Actor) | Chen Bi De (Actor) | Bryant Mak (Actor) | Chen Xue Wen (Actor) | Shui Jie (Actor) | ZHANG YING | はたの ゆうすけ Eric Tsang (Actor) | 여 문락 (Actor) | Elaine Jin (Actor) | Charmaine Fong (Actor) | Ng Siu Hin (Actor) | Chen Bi De (Actor) | Bryant Mak (Actor) | Chen Xue Wen (Actor) | Shui Jie (Actor) | ZHANG YING | Yusuke Hatano
Director: Wong Chun 黃進 黄进 Wong Chun Wong Chun
Producer: Derek Chiu | Heiward Mak 趙崇基 | 麥 曦茵 赵崇基 | 麦 曦茵 趙崇基 (デレク・チウ) | 麥曦茵 (ヘイワード・マック) Chiu Sung Kei | Heiward Mak
Writer: Chen Chu Heng 陳 楚珩 陈 楚珩 Chen Chu Heng Chen Chu Heng
Blu-ray Region Code: A - Americas (North, Central and South except French Guiana), Korea, Japan, South East Asia (including Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan) What is it?
Release Date: 2017-11-24
Language: Cantonese, Mandarin
Subtitles: English, Traditional Chinese
Country of Origin: Hong Kong
Picture Format: [HD] High Definition What is it?
Disc Format(s): Blu-ray
Screen Resolution: 1080p (1920 x 1080 progressive scan)
Rating: IIA
Duration: 102 (mins)
Publisher: Panorama (HK)
Package Weight: 100 (g)
Shipment Unit: 1 What is it?
YesAsia Catalog No.: 1063295009

Product Information

* 特別收錄: 
-《一念無明》製作花絮(上) — 瘋狂世界下的一種註解
-《一念無明》製作花絮(下) — 生活下的眾人、角色
- 首版預告、正式預告
- 聾人及弱聽人士專用字幕

代表香港出戰
奧斯卡金像獎最佳外語片

榮獲
第36屆香港電影金像獎
新晉導演 最佳男配角 最佳女配角

第53屆金馬獎
最佳新導演 最佳女配角

第11屆香港電影導演會年度大獎
新晉導演獎

第23屆香港電影評論學會大獎
最佳導演 最佳編劇

主演
余文樂 曾志偉
金燕玲 方皓玟

阿東(余文樂 飾)患有躁鬱症,因父親離家不顧,獨力照顧飽受病患折磨的母親(金燕玲 飾)。母子二人情緒互相牽引激化,猶如漫長的困獸鬥。一天,阿東如常替失禁的母親沖洗,拉扯間發生意外,導致母親死亡。阿東的父親大海(曾志偉 飾)驚覺一直逃避的問題發酵成了悲劇。獨居多年的他在愧疚和孤獨驅使下,應醫院建議,接阿東到自己的板間房暫住。

故事從這裡開始。兩個背負沉重愧疚的大男人只剩下對方,對方卻是自己最不能面對的過去。當二人一步一步走出過去的陰霾和枷鎖,在狹縫間建立關係,更大的壓迫卻來自社會。

附送【一念無明 電影原聲大碟CD】乙隻

Tracklist
1. Hospital
2. (Dialogue)
3. Dawn Alone (Cold)
4. Recalling
5. Blue Memories
6. Ma Fan Nei
7. Dawn Alone (Strings)
8. Orange Coloured Sound
9. (Dialogue)
10. 黃衍仁 -《裝睡的人》
11. Heaven to Hell
12. Black Chocolate
13. Killing Mom
14. (Dialogue)
15. Dawn Alone
16. Dawn Alone (Boy)
17. 黃衍仁 -《逆瞄》

Bonus Tracks
18. Sound Sample
19. Meeting Father
20. Happy Heaven Life
21. More Reverse
22. Dawn Alone (Long Version)


Additional Information may be provided by the manufacturer, supplier, or a third party, and may be in its original language

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YumCha! Asian Entertainment Reviews and Features

Professional Review of "Mad World (2017) (Blu-ray + OST) (Hong Kong Version)"

November 24, 2017

This professional review refers to Mad World (2017) (Blu-ray) (Hong Kong Version)
Directed by Fresh Wave short film veteran Wong Chun, Mad World is a frank, discomfiting yet remarkably sensitive look at mental illness in Hong Kong. The film tells the tale of Wong Sai-Tung (Shawn Yue), who suffers from bipolar disorder and must acclimate back to the world after a stint in a mental hospital. Tung was committed following a terrible incident involving his mother (Elaine Kam). She had been emotionally and verbally abusive towards Tung, so while a blow-up was understandable, it unfortunately took a much more severe form. Tung now lives in a sub-divided flat with his estranged father Wong (Eric Tsang), who struggles to come to terms with his son's illness. The incident took a toll on Tung – besides losing his job and his fiancée Jenny (Charmaine Fong), he lost the respect of just about everyone who knows him. Tung is now at the lowest point in his life – can he right his emotions and return from the brink?

Mad World opens with a flashback that shows Tung receiving verbal abuse from his clearly mentally-ill mother, as she blames him for ruining her life, screaming at him and swearing profusely while he just stands passively, letting it happen. This is only the start of the slings and arrows directed Tung's way over the course of the film, as he's subjected to people whispering that he's "a psycho," or insensitively dismissed as a prospect for jobs. Tung isn't entirely a victim; he's defensive and prideful, e.g., he initially refuses to take his anti-depressants, plus he shows up at a friend's wedding unannounced where he – without being asked to – defends himself publicly. There are some minor moments that seem a little larger than life, but Tung's experiences largely seem credible and real. He tries to fit in, experiences adjustment difficulties, and his mood and mistakes weigh on him perpetually.

It's to director Wong Chun and screenwriter Florence Chen's credit that Mad World doesn't become a Tung pity party. Tung has a tough lot but he's not a martyr, and Shawn Yue manages to make him seem both sympathetic and intimidating, in that he looks like he can go off at any time. Not that Tung is a monster, as many characters are quick to label him as, but when his depression creeps up on him or his ego takes over, you can see how he causes pain to both himself and others. Most of these details aren't spoon-fed; Wong's direction is observant and attentive but audiences have to do a fair amount of work as Wong uses simple set-ups and long takes that force audiences to observe. Acting is low-key and dialogue is largely natural; the filmmakers mostly let the actors and incidents carry the film, and that's wise on their part.

Shawn Yue puts his darker side to good use here, and turns in a laudable dramatic performance. Yue's slacker sensibilities are actually well-suited to a depressed character, in that his passivity can be used to convey uncertainty or restrained emotion, and Yue creates a discernible tension within Tung. However, Eric Tsang and, to a lesser degree, Elaine Kam are stronger. Kam incisively channels the pain and also the pathetic, self-aware side of a mentally-ill mother, while Tsang does the heaviest lifting as the concerned father. Tsang's character is the audience insert in many ways; he's the one that cares for Tung while fearing him due to his lack of understanding of bipolar disorder. The character runs the risk of being too maudlin, but Tsang hits all the right notes even when it's his turn to cry despairingly. He also gets the big "pearl of wisdom" moment but it's an earned sentiment appropriate to the character arc of a father learning to accept his son.

At one point, the story does foreshadow a positive, "chin up" direction, as if Tung will get past his burden and move out of darkness and into the sunlight. Such a story turn would be pleasing but far from realistic, and it also wouldn't fit Mad World's M.O. The filmmakers seem to be attempting an honest portrait of mental illness and, indeed, of average people and how they behave and operate. The supporting characters, while not a main focus, have distinctly-drawn lives of their own and when they come into contact with Tung it can lead to awkward, even awful results that are frightening in how real they seem. In life, people can be villains and victims simultaneously, and the same goes for Tung. Ultimately, these clashes with others lead to Tung relapsing in what might seem a minor and even silly way. Yet everything portrayed is true to the emotional and mental issues he faces.

It's hard to imagine Mad World finding a terribly large audience as it lacks a commercial story and style. Yet it's a worthy film, not only in its depiction of depression, but in how it accurately portrays lower class Hong Kong life without grandstanding for it. Despite its settings and subject matter, Mad World steers mostly clear of being a social critique. The most the film does in that arena is show the lack of help and kindness Hong Kong people naturally have towards the mentally ill, and even then the filmmakers refuse to pound the pulpit. The result is something that may feel anticlimactic – indeed the characters don't reach a conclusion so much as switch paths in life – but there's an honesty in portraying this conflict as something that can't really be won. Instead, if a few characters and the audience itself can gleam some understanding and acceptance of Tung, well, then Mad World has already accomplished enough.

by Kozo - LoveHKFilm.com

This original content has been created by or licensed to YesAsia.com, and cannot be copied or republished in any medium without the express written permission of YesAsia.com.

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