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Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version) DVD Region All

Chui Tien You (Actor) | Kate Yeung (Actor) | Anjo Leung (Actor) | Adam Wong (Director)
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Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)
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Customer Rating: Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8 out of 10 (1)

YesAsia Editorial Description

Adam Wong, director of the acclaimed 2004 film When Beckham Met Owen brings magic to the streets of Mongkok in the winning Hong Kong indie film Magic Boy! Eric Tsang produced this youth romance about a budding love triangle between two amateur magicians, played by newcomer Anjo Leung and Tsui Tin Yau (AV), and a pretty salesgirl played by Kate Yeung (Eternal Summer). Wong's film possesses a unique local flavor and an irresistible charm uncommon in more commercially-driven Hong Kong films. Young star Anjo Leung is a real-life apprentice of Hong Kong magic guru Harry Wong, and handles the film's numerous illusions with real showmanship and panache. A smaller release by Hong Kong standards, Magic Boy is no less worthy than the territory's bigger releases, and qualifies as one of 2007's unheralded gems.

Carefree, playful Leggo (Anjo Leung) delivers food by day, but it's his second job that he truly enjoys. Leggo is an amateur magician, and spends many of his evenings helping his stoic pal Hei (Tsui Tin Yau) perform illusions on the streets of Mongkok. Leggo's world changes when he spies the lovely Wing (Kate Yeung) at one of the performances, and begins to woo her by showing up at her workplace and performing unsolicited, and frequently charming illusions. Wing is resistant at first, but her resolve softens due to Leggo's enthusiasm and his winning skill with illusions. However, an attraction bubbles between Wing and Hei too, and just having a girlfriend can't be the only aspiration a young man like Leggo should have. Like magic, love initially amazes, but over time the enchantment may fade. This Magic Boy must eventually grow up and become a man.

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Technical Information

Product Title: Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version) 魔術男 (DVD) (香港版) 魔术男 (DVD) (香港版) 魔術男 (DVD) (香港版) Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)
Artist Name(s): Chui Tien You (Actor) | Kate Yeung (Actor) | Anjo Leung (Actor) 徐天佑 (Actor) | 楊淇 (Actor) | 梁曉豐 (Actor) 徐天佑 (Actor) | 杨淇 (Actor) | 梁晓丰 (Actor) 徐天佑(チョイ・ティンヤウ) (Actor) | 楊淇(ケイト・ヨン) (Actor) | 梁曉豐 (アンジョー・リョン) (Actor) Chui Tien You (Actor) | Kate Yeung (Actor) | Anjo Leung (Actor)
Director: Adam Wong 黃修平 黄修平 黄修平 (アダム・ウォン) Adam Wong
Release Date: 2008-02-05
Language: Cantonese, Mandarin
Subtitles: English, Traditional Chinese
Place of Origin: Hong Kong
Picture Format: NTSC What is it?
Aspect Ratio: Letterboxed
Sound Information: Hi-Fi Stereo, Dolby Digital
Disc Format(s): DVD
Region Code: All Region What is it?
Rating: IIA
Duration: 89 (mins)
Publisher: Panorama (HK)
Package Weight: 120 (g)
Shipment Unit: 1 What is it?
YesAsia Catalog No.: 1005170613

Product Information

* Screen Format: Letter
* Sound Mix: Dolby Digital, Stereo

導演︰黃修平
Director: Adam Wong

Leggo,已經二十歲,還徹頭徹尾像個小孩子。每天,他踏著單車穿梭於他的遊樂場——旺角,送外賣兼送魔術表演,使他成為旺角食客們的寵兒。一天,他在西洋菜南街被阿Wing的乳溝所吸引,便「立志」要追求她,每天偷借送外賣的時間,到阿Wing任職的二手名牌手袋店施展渾身解數。

Wing,才二十歲,對愛情的態度已變得很冷淡,覺得「男孩子不是低B就是鹹濕」。可是她竟被一個魔術師的小把戲深深著迷,此人卻不是Leggo,而是他的師傅阿希。

Childhood friends Hei and Leggo run a café where they perform magic tricks for the customers. Leggo, a carefree optimist, is smitten with Wing, who works in a neighbourhood store. Wing is touched by Leggo's devotion, but also sees the purposeful and mature Hei as her ideal partner. The follow-up to WHEN BECKHAM MET OWEN by director Adam Wong, who won the Independent Spirit Award at the 2004 HKAFF, MAGIC BOY is a simple love story that seeks to define what it means to grow up.
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Awards

This film has received 1 award nomination(s). All Award-Winning Asian Films

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YumCha! Asian Entertainment Reviews and Features

Professional Review of "Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

May 8, 2008

An unassuming youth romance, Magic Boy is a fine antidote to the over-calculated excesses of such audience-favorite relationship movies as Love is Not All Around. Director Adam Wong (When Beckham Met Owen) directs this Mongkok-set tale, which stars newcomer Anjo Leung as Leggo, an amateur magician and food deliveryman whose positive attitude can be seen in the carefree way in which he approaches his daily life. His friend and partner, Hei (Tsui Tin-Yau) is much more serious, striving to become a stage magician while honing his craft as a performer on the Mongkok streets.

It's during a performance in Mongkok that Leggo first spies Wing (Kate Yeung), and he becomes immediately smitten with her pretty face and modest décolletage. His new goal in life is to woo her, which he does by showing up at her workplace, a second-hand designer bag shop, to mistakenly deliver food. When she calls him on his mistakes, he usually performs a magic trick, leading to a daily ritual that's as entertaining as it is sometimes overplayed. Leggo is not traditionally handsome and is a bit of a spaz, but he's a likable fellow whose earnest desire for Wing's attention is not without its charm.

Eventually, Leggo's perseverance pays off and Wing agrees to date him, but not before hidden details quietly surface. Wing secretly holds a torch for Hei, which first developed when he performed a trick for her in a local café. On his part, Hei isn't completely blind to Wing's obvious girlish charms, but Leggo is his pal, so Hei mopes quietly in the background. Meanwhile, Leggo is so enraptured with his new girlfriend that he never seems to calm down. He squires Wing enthusiastically, but also seems too satisfied with his attainment of her company, which he describes as the only goal he has in his life. Before long, this status quo begs a reevaluation, and Wing resorts to asking Leggo the point blank question, "Why can't you grow up?"

Magic Boy touches upon many familiar themes and conflicts common to Hong Kong youth films, using occasional voiceover and colorful local details to explore the push and pull of young adults as they struggle with dating and maturity. There's really not much new in Adam Wong's "time-to-come-of-age" film, but the film possesses a fun energy and a generous portrait of local Hong Kong life, and seems to accurately convey both the precious and perishable qualities of young love in affecting and lovely style. Some events seemingly have no cause or effect, but there's rhyme, if not reason to what occurs onscreen. When the film doesn't follow expected narrative convention, the winning energy and upbeat pace take over. Part of the fun is in the film's use of magic. Most of the tricks are real, and are performed live by Anjo Leung, a real-life apprentice of Hong Kong magic guru Harry Wong, who has a funny and very Hong Kong-centric cameo. Much of Magic Boy plays towards local Hong Kong residents, from the cameos to the street-level scenes, to even the numerous uniformed schoolgirls wandering about, getting inspired by Leggo's magic. Leggo's magic creates wannabe magicians, and the device is a bit cloying. However, the whole moves by so breezily that it's easy to buy, and also enjoy. The tricks are also fun, and the film effectively conveys their charm and sometimes their wonder.

As Leggo, Anjo Leung sometimes overplays, betraying his status as an acting newcomer. Still, once one gets accustomed to his initial manic energy, he becomes likable and even identifiable. Kate Yeung is very winning as the local girl of every Mongkok boy's dreams, possessing strong character and a photogenic presence that enlivens the screen. Tsui Tin-Yau is the weakest of the three, his character's stoic cool sometimes coming off as inert aloofness. Tsui doesn't make a very compelling third point of this potential love triangle, though he has a few amusing moments that poke fun at his character's omnipresent stoicism.

When Magic Boy ends, it doesn't feel like much actually happened. Some characters move forward with what they have, while others don't, but somehow it feels that some change, however slight, has occurred. One minor joy in Magic Boy is that each main character actually gets to make a decision about their immediate future, and whatever progression occurs feels natural and earned, and not like the lip service so commonly associated with a youth film. Whether or not the decisions are the correct ones is irrelevant; it's merely another stop on the road to maturity. Again, not a very new or inspired theme, but Magic Boy gives new life to old tricks. In magic and in film, it's sometimes effort, showmanship, and sleight of hand that make all the difference.

by Kozo - LoveHKFilm.com

Editor's Pick of "Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

Picked By Sanwei
See all this editor's picks


February 24, 2008

Sleight of Hand
Adam Wong made a solid directorial debut in 2004 with the indie feature When Beckham Met Owen, an insignificant-slice-of-life drama about a middle school boy who begins to question his own sexual orientation. The film was mostly an exercise in mundane realism, capturing the unexciting living conditions and internal conflicts of a housing estate youth in everyday Hong Kong. And yet for a film with unattractive photography, amateur leads, and no emotional or narrative ups and downs to speak of, When Beckham Met Owen was quite palatable, just on the brink of meaning something. It was a fine start for a new director working on a shoestring budget, and Wong has made good on his promise with his sophomore effort Magic Boy.

Like Beckham, Magic Boy is a simple urban youth story whose significance lies in its utter insignificance. This time Wong makes the mundane charming with more outward characters and some good old magic. The film is situated in familiar local haunts - Mongkok, tea cafe, second-hand designer handbag store - but run through a bright, colorful, and suspiciously friendly filter that makes Hong Kong seem if not magical, at least very pleasant.

Newcomer Anjo Leung stars as Leggo, a cheerfully immature delivery boy who practices street magic for fun. To Leggo, as long he's doing magic, he's still a kid. In contract, his best friend Hei (Tsui Tin Yau) is a lot more serious about the craft and life in general, striving to become a professional magician. Minor ripples enter their lives when the friends meet shopkeeper Wing (Kate Yeung), and Leggo starts to court her with every magic trick up his sleeve.

Magic Boy has the essential elements set up for romantic triangle angst, tests of friendship, and coming-of-age lessons, but the resultant film politely refuses to fall neatly into place. Instead, Magic Boy unassumingly meets the audience halfway with more fickle, less drama, and something close to stagnant twenty-something reality amid the minor youth wrinkles and smile-inducing magic tricks. Sporting a wide grin and no baggage, budding magician, actor, and singer Anjo Leung handles the magic and the role well. If his acting is a bit overexcited at times, it is at the same time natural and likable, offering a sincere slacker charm to counter Tsui Tin Yau's poker face. Kate Yeung is lovely as always as the girl in between, not only in romance but also in maturity.

Magic Boy is a mild offering, the story of three young people between maturity and mischief, somewhere on the reluctant, but inevitable journey of adulthood. Hong Kong is rosy, conflicts are tempered, and days go by in quick time with slow progress. Nothing of great significance is likely to happen in the world of Magic Boy, but the film is very enjoyable and fanciful in its own subdued way. Magic Boy is perhaps not much more than a street performer's sleight of hand, magical for five seconds, but as Tsui Tin Yau's character notes in the film, the small tricks are the most fun.

This original content has been created by or licensed to YesAsia.com, and cannot be copied or republished in any medium without the express written permission of YesAsia.com.

Customer Review of "Magic Boy (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

Average Customer Rating for this Edition: Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8 out of 10 (1)

Kevin Kennedy
See all my reviews


March 12, 2008

1 people found this review helpful

Magic Boy becomes a magic man Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8 out of 10
In "Magic Boy", Leggo (Anjo Leung) and Hei (Tsui Tin Yau) have been best friends and fellow magic enthusiasts since they were little kids. Now Hei tries to build a career as a professional magician by doing his tricks on the streets of Mongkok. Leggo, on the other hand, a delivery boy for a restaurant, simply uses his magic to bring smiles to people's faces, including the face of Wing (Kate Yeung), the girl for whom he has fallen head over heels in love.

Wing works at a second-hand shop for high-end handbags, where a Greek chorus of schoolgirls encourages her to embrace Leggo's love. However, Wing is troubled by Leggo's lack of ambition and harbors a secret crush for Hei (just as Hei has a crush on her). How will this love triangle play out?

"Magic Boy" appears to have been shot on a shoestring budget; the budget limitations and occasionally amateurish acting produce some awkward scenes. Yet those awkward scenes are more than outweighed by the good-natured sincerity of the story and the performances. I truly enjoyed this story of young love and recommend it unreservedly for a general audience.
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