By using our website, you accept and agree with our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.  
Image Gallery Now Loading… Previous Next Close

Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version) DVD Region All

Elanne Kwong (Actor) | William Chan (Actor) | Danny Pang (Director) | Stephanie Cheng (Actor)
This product is temporarily out of stock
Sign up to be notified when this item becomes available for sale
Name: Email Address:
  
This item belongs to:
Important information about purchasing this product:
  • This product is accepted for return under certain conditions. For more details, please refer to our return policy.
Sign in to rate and write review
Customer Rating: Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8 out of 10 (1)

YesAsia Editorial Description

Horror master Danny Pang (The Eye) brings together an up-and-coming idol cast for a fast-paced and unpredictable urban youth thriller played out on the sleepless streets of Hong Kong. The sleek film pivots around a convenience store holdup that changes the lives of a group of separate but connected youths. Pang employs Vantage Point-style storytelling to slickly cross different narratives and characters arcs into one through multi-perspective flashbacks. The star-studded ensemble cast includes Elanne Kong (Rebellion), model-turned-actress Chrissie Chau, James Ho and Gary Chiu of Square, DJ Leo Chim, Wylie Chiu, as well as singers William Chan, Pakho Chow, Stephanie Cheng, and Terence Siufay, who were all recently in Split Second Murders.

Convenience store clerks Chrissie (Chrissie Chau) and Katy (Carolyn Chan) decide to get back at their sleazy manager Leo (Leo Chim) by having their boyfriends (Terence Siufay and Jones Xu) pose as robbers and hold up the store, but events escalate out of control into murder. What started as an elaborate prank sets off a butterfly effect of crime, consequence, and desperation as more and more people get pulled into the mess.

© 2009-2020 YesAsia.com Ltd. All rights reserved. This original content has been created by or licensed to YesAsia.com, and cannot be copied or republished in any medium without the express written permission of YesAsia.com.

Technical Information

Product Title: Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version) 關人7事 (DVD) (香港版) 关人7事 (DVD) (香港版) 關人7事 (香港版) Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)
Also known as: 關人七事, 玩大咗 关人七事, 玩大咗
Artist Name(s): Elanne Kwong (Actor) | William Chan (Actor) | Stephanie Cheng (Actor) | Terence Siufay (Actor) | Pakho Chau (Actor) | Wylie Chiu (Actor) | James Ho (Actor) | Jeremy Jones Xu (Actor) | Chrissie Chau (Actor) | Gary Chiu (Actor) | Kung Ka Yan (Actor) | Carolyn Chan (Actor) | Kung Chi Yun (Actor) 江若琳 (Actor) | 陳 偉霆 (Actor) | 鄭融 (Actor) | 小肥 (Actor) | 周柏豪 (Actor) | 趙碩之 (Actor) | 何 尚謙 (Actor) | 徐 正曦 (Actor) | 周秀娜 (Actor) | 趙 俊承 (Actor) | 龔 嘉欣 (Actor) | 陳 楚喬 (Actor) | 龔慈恩 (Actor) 江若琳 (Actor) | 陈 伟霆 (Actor) | 郑融 (Actor) | 小肥 (Actor) | 周柏豪 (Actor) | 赵硕之 (Actor) | 何 尚谦 (Actor) | 徐 正曦 (Actor) | 周秀娜 (Actor) | 赵 俊承 (Actor) | 龚 嘉欣 (Actor) | 陈 楚乔 (Actor) | 龚慈恩 (Actor) 江若琳(エレイン・コン) (Actor) | 陳偉霆 (ウィリアム・チャン) (Actor) | 鄭融 (ステファニー・チェン) (Actor) | 小肥 (テレンス・シウフェイ) (Actor) | 周柏豪 (パコ・チャウ) (Actor) | Wylie Chiu (Actor) | James Ho (Actor) | Jeremy Jones Xu (Actor) | 周秀娜 (クリッシー・チャウ) (Actor) | Gary Chiu (Actor) | Kung Ka Yan (Actor) | Carolyn Chan (Actor) | 龔慈恩(ミニー・クン) (Actor) Elanne Kwong (Actor) | William Chan (Actor) | Stephanie Cheng (Actor) | Terence Siufay (Actor) | Pakho Chau (Actor) | Wylie Chiu (Actor) | James Ho (Actor) | Jeremy Jones Xu (Actor) | Chrissie Chau (Actor) | Gary Chiu (Actor) | Kung Ka Yan (Actor) | Carolyn Chan (Actor) | Kung Chi Yun (Actor)
Director: Danny Pang 彭發 彭 发 彭發 (ダニー・パン) Danny Pang
Release Date: 2009-12-23
Language: Cantonese, Mandarin
Subtitles: English, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese
Country of Origin: Hong Kong
Picture Format: NTSC What is it?
Aspect Ratio: Widescreen
Sound Information: Dolby Digital 5.1
Disc Format(s): DVD
Region Code: All Region What is it?
Rating: IIB
Duration: 81 (mins)
Package Weight: 120 (g)
Shipment Unit: 1 What is it?
YesAsia Catalog No.: 1021790125

Product Information

Director : Danny Pang

Convenience store clerks Chrissie and Katy decide to get back at their sleazy manager Leo by having their friends pose as robbers and hold up the store, but events escalate out of control into murder. What started as an elaborate prank sets off a butterfly effect of crime, consequence, and desperation as more and more people get pulled into the mess. Horror master Danny Pang brings together an up-and-coming idol cast for a fast-paced and unpredictable urban youth thriller played out on the sleepless streets of Hong Kong.
Additional Information may be provided by the manufacturer, supplier, or a third party, and may be in its original language

Other Versions of "Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

Customers who bought "Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)" also bought

Customers who bought videos directed by Danny Pang also bought videos by these directors:

Search Keywords

The following keywords are associated with this product. Please click on a keyword to search for similar items.

YumCha! Asian Entertainment Reviews and Features

Professional Review of "Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

December 29, 2009

Director Danny Pang's Seven 2 One earned some buzz prior to release - though not for entirely positive reasons. Six members of the film's young cast also appeared in Herman Yau's Split Second Murders, which was shot after but released before Seven 2 One, with Seven's producers claiming that Murders ripped off their film's ending. In another controversy, the poster for Seven 2 One took its inspiration from the 2008 Hollywood thriller Vantage Point, with the image concept constituting a direct swipe. With all these accusations of "who copied who" flying around, does anyone remember that there's an actual movie to discuss? Hopefully they do, because Seven 2 One is a slick, if unsubstantial thriller that consistently entertains.

Seven 2 One's English language title refers to its seven separate stories, and how they ultimately converge into a single event: a convenience store robbery. After beginning, the film moves quickly to the robbery, where a masked thief demands the store's cash from the counter girl (Chrissie Chau) before getting into a fight with a loan shark (William Chan). While the counter girl and two customers (Carolyn Chan and Wylie Chiu) witness the event, the loan shark is stabbed and the thief flees.

Outside the store, various other players converge on the site. A cop (James Ho of boyband Square) arrives with a perp (Gary Chiu, also of Square) in tow, and other unidentified characters played by the rest of the idol cast show their mugs. Then it's flashback time - and it's only the first of many. Each flashback reveals one character's story, providing unseen and sometimes surprising perspective before reaching the robbery and then flashing back again, only to focus on a different character and their activities before the robbery. Repeat ad nauseum until a connected and hopefully compelling whole is revealed. It's like Rashomon, only not as good.

Actually, what Seven 2 One really resembles is Vantage Point - so it looks like ripping off the poster was more than just a coincidence. Narratively, both films use the flashback structure in the same manner, going for actual rather than subjective perspective, and using bombastic editing and music cues to initiate each flashback. The loud, intrusive music goes beyond just transitions; like many a Pang Brothers film before it, Seven 2 One delights in adding pulse-pounding soundtracks to scenes that don't require them - such as scenes with two people sitting on a sofa.

This "super obvious music" technique ramps up the tension, but it also creates occasional giggles. The movie isn't all tense moments; some scenes are quiet and attempt feeling, and having loud tinkly piano or thundering drums only makes them seem over-the-top or jarring. Pang's choices with his music are legitimate in that they do get his audience's attention, but arranging them differently or simply economizing could have resulted in a better, more felt film.

Not that Seven 2 One is bad - it isn't, and proves to be a fun and stylish little thriller. Starting the film with the robbery creates an immediate anticipation and continuing interest, which helps make up for the occasional lulls that occur when introducing new characters, all of whom connect to one another. Let's see: Chrissie Chau's counter girl hates her lecherous boss (radio DJ Leo Chim), who in turn is attempting to swindle a bar girl (Elanne Kong) into the sack. She's living with a compulsive gambler (Pakho Chow), who owes money to William Chan's loan shark, who's being investigated by James Ho's cop. The cop has an annoying brother (Siu Fei), etc., etc. I could go on and on.

The film's multiple stories turn out to be surprisingly interconnected, stretching across a web of intertwined characters, situations and even dark themes. Nothing here is extreme; despite several characters inhabiting the seamy side of life, their stories are not exceptionally lurid or attention-grabbing. Ultimately, it’s the time-shifting narrative and structure that carries the film, with the unseen connections between characters providing momentary bursts of cleverness. It's all very light but also efficient and fast-moving, with pretty stars, the trademark Pang style, and very little moralizing to get in the way of a good time.

That is, until the ending. Once the credits roll, the film provides a "what if" scenario showing the audience how things might have turned out if the characters had employed the Golden Rule rather than the self-serving attitudes youth are prone to. The device is well meaning but also highlights just how insubstantial the previous 80 minutes were. During the actual film, the element of choice is seldom presented, and without moments of reflection from the characters, the ending device comes off as tacked on and even pandering. By the way, a similar story device was used in Split Second Murders, so that's what that entire hullabaloo was about.

Controversy or depth aside, Seven 2 One survives on its own merits. The film looks great and moves briskly, and the actors are largely effective despite being lumped into either the leng mo ("young model") or idol category. Danny Pang has stated that one reason he made the film was simply to give new actors a chance to show their stuff. He largely succeeded; many of the actors breathe decent life into their not-very-likable characters, and hey, they're certainly easy on the eyes (except, of course, for Siu Fei). Seven 2 One is a capable, genre-friendly introduction to this next generation of supposedly promising talent. Let's cross our fingers and hope that they - and Hong Kong Cinema - can reach greater heights.

by Kozo - LoveHKFilm.com

Feature articles that mention "Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

This original content has been created by or licensed to YesAsia.com, and cannot be copied or republished in any medium without the express written permission of YesAsia.com.

Customer Review of "Seven 2 One (DVD) (Hong Kong Version)"

Average Customer Rating for this Edition: Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8 out of 10 (1)

numinair
See all my reviews


February 5, 2010

1 people found this review helpful

Disadvantage points Customer Review Rated Bad 8 - 8 out of 10
Although the DVD seemingly depicts some sort of media scandalous wotnot, “Seven 2 One” is quite a wider berthed movie to muse about, of how separate people’s negative social interactions, in dark unfelt chorus, connect and contribute to two peoples deaths; a robbery and tragic brutal killing at a convenience store followed by a tragic road accident. The two deaths are shown at the beginning, followed by an introduction of a succession of characters that have direct and indirect cause and effect to the tragedies, shown in compartmentalized and ever revealing flashbacks. All protagonists suffer problematical social issues; Ling works as a bar girl to make money to help her in debt gambling boyfriend who owes money to a loan shark, two female convenience store workers get ‘rubbed up the wrong way’ by their lecherous employer, a policeman arrests a man for murder at a bar and conflicts with his brother about street offending problems, two young men ‘prank’ a perverted store owner for sexually harassing their girlfriends and two lesbian lovers find some male attention causing dire friction and jealousy between an already love tiff gal relationship. Varied incidents from the shadows of the metropolis that become interconnected as bar girl, police, gambler, shop girls, lesbians, street urchins and perverts get lead up the garden crossed-paths to partake in a final culmination of tragic death.

“Seven 2 One” as similarities to Japanese film “A Stranger of Mine” by director Kenji Uchida, another disadvantage point type. Like media news and its bite sized neutral limits make for partial perception, here vanilla acuity is a stabbing in a convince store between a customer and a comic masked thief, but more is beneath the mask of obscurities here. Going beyond the ‘see’ superficial to see other parallel onion layer motions that bring a wider understanding of ‘why’. Okay Danny Oxide may have borrowed ideas here, but this film is active, fluid, coherent and well made. Characters make you think what ‘if’ these guys could 'awaken' and see how erratic impulse is contributing to an already upside down picture of themselves, and avoid adverse tragedy by an overview of negative pedantic focus; jealousy, greed, self-interest and so forth. For a collective of HK poppettes (too many to name, alas) the acting is very good and Elanne Kong as Ling is doing champion at the movies now (Rebellion also). Done before, but a good HK film!
Did you find this review helpful? Yes (Report This)

Browse Other Related Categories

Wet Season Summer Sale 2020 The Captain Ninth Happiness The Grand Grandmaster Eighteen Springs Better Days
  • Region & Language: No Region Selected - English
  • *Reference Currency: No Reference Currency
 Change Preferences 
Please enable cookies in your browser to experience all the features of our site, including the ability to make a purchase.