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Ashura-jo no Hitomi Premium Edition (Limited Edition)(Japan Version - English Subtitles) DVD Region 2

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Ashura-jo no Hitomi Premium Edition (Limited Edition)(Japan Version - English Subtitles)
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YesAsia Editorial Description

Ichikawa Somegoro stars as Izumo, a retired demon queller who now passes his time as a kabuki actor in nineteenth century Edo. After accidentally killing a child, Izumo swore never to draw his sword again, but evil is afoot and a conspiracy is in full swing to awaken the powerful demon queen Ashura. Can Izumo really stand back and watch the demons take over the World, or will he join the fight once more and battle the forces of evil?

Featuring great performances, spectacular CG effects and a thumping soundtrack, director Yojiro Takita's Ashura-jo no Hitomi is a full blown visual spectacle that will delight all fans of fantasy and samurai movies. This DVD edition features the theatrical film subtitled in English, as well as a bonus disc with various extras.

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Technical Information

Product Title: Ashura-jo no Hitomi Premium Edition (Limited Edition)(Japan Version - English Subtitles) 阿修羅城之瞳 Premium Edition (限定版)(日本版 - 英文字幕) 阿修罗城之瞳 Premium Edition (限定版)(日本版 - 英文字幕) 阿修羅城の瞳 プレミアム・エディション プレミアム・エディション(初回限定生産) Ashura-jo no Hitomi Premium Edition (Limited Edition)(Japan Version - English Subtitles)
Artist Name(s): Watabe Atsuro | Naito Takashi | Sawajiri Erika | Hotoru Yukijiro | Yamada Tatsuo | Kohinata Fumiyo | Tsuchiya Kumiko | Ohkura Koji | Kan Hanae | Higuchi Kanako | Takita Yojiro | Miyazawa Rie | Minagawa Sarutoki | Nakashima Kazuki | Ichikawa Somegoro 渡部篤郎 | 內藤剛志 | 澤尻英龍華 | 螢雪次朗 | 山田辰夫 | 小日向文世 | Tsuchiya Kumiko | 大倉孝二 | 韓英惠 | 樋口可南子 | 瀧田洋二郎 | 宮澤理惠 | Minagawa Sarutoki | 中島かずき | 市川染五郎 渡部笃郎 | 内藤刚志 | 泽尻英龙华 | 萤雪次朗 | Yamada Tatsuo | 小日向文世 | Tsuchiya Kumiko | 大仓孝二 | Kan Hanae | 樋口可南子 | 泷田洋二郎 | 宫泽理惠 | Minagawa Sarutoki | 中岛かずき | 市川染五郎 渡部篤郎 | 内藤剛志 | 沢尻エリカ | 螢雪次朗 | 山田辰夫 | 小日向文世 | 土屋久美子 | 大倉孝二 | 韓英恵 | 樋口可南子 | 滝田洋二郎 | 宮沢りえ | 皆川猿時 | 二反田雅澄 | 関根あすか | Nakashima Kazuki | 長田達也(照明) | 林田裕至(美術) | 柳島克己(撮影) | 菅野よう子(音楽) | 冨田伸子(編集) | 原口智生(特殊造型) | 戸田山雅司(脚本) | 川口晴(脚本) | 小野寺修(録音) | 松本肇(視覚効果) | 諸鍛冶裕太(アクション監督) | 竹田団吾(衣裳デザイン) | 桑原和生 | 山中陽子 | 鵜沢優子 | 市川染五郎[七代目] | 平澤友美 | 市川染五郎 Watabe Atsuro | Naito Takashi | Sawajiri Erika | Hotoru Yukijiro | Yamada Tatsuo | Kohinata Fumiyo | Tsuchiya Kumiko | Ohkura Koji | Kan Hanae | Higuchi Kanako | Takita Yojiro | Miyazawa Rie | Minagawa Sarutoki | Nakashima Kazuki | Ichikawa Somegoro
Director: Takita Yojiro 瀧田洋二郎 泷田洋二郎 中島かずき(原作) | 滝田洋二郎 Takita Yojiro
Release Date: 2005-10-29
Publisher Product Code: DA-785
Language: Japanese
Country of Origin: Japan
Disc Format(s): DVD
Region Code: 2 - Japan, Europe, South Africa, Greenland and the Middle East (including Egypt) What is it?
Duration: 119 (mins)
Publisher: Shochiku Home Video
Other Information: 2DVD
Shipment Unit: 2 What is it?
YesAsia Catalog No.: 1004048790

Product Information

[アーティスト/ キャスト]
滝田洋二郎 (監督) / 中島かずき / 市川染五郎[七代目] / 宮沢りえ

化粧箱入りデジパック

[特典情報]
特典ディスク付/特典:特製ブックレット、特製ポストカード

[テクニカル・インフォメーション]
初回生産限定
製作国 : 日本 (Japan)
公開年 : 2005

[ストーリー]
の異名をとっていた人気舞台役者・病葉出門(市川染五郎)。女は恋をすると鬼の王・阿修羅に生まれ変わってしまう恐るべき宿命を背負ったつばき(宮沢りえ)。^.^二人の悲しき恋が幕を開けた時、阿修羅復活に向けて動く美しき鬼女・美惨(樋口可南子)と、自らの野望の為、鬼に魂を売った「鬼御門」の安倍邪空(渡部篤郎)の陰謀が、出門とつばきに迫り寄る。^.^逆しまの縁に結ばれた人と鬼が入り乱れ、愛と欲望が渦巻く中、遂に江戸の上空に壮厳な阿修羅城が浮かび上がる。つばきを追って阿修羅城へ向かう出門。^.^その先にあるのは、滅びか、救いか—。

Additional Information may be provided by the manufacturer, supplier, or a third party, and may be in its original language

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YumCha! Asian Entertainment Reviews and Features

Professional Review of "Ashura-jo no Hitomi Premium Edition (Limited Edition)(Japan Version - English Subtitles)"

November 21, 2005

This professional review refers to Ashura-jo no Hitomi (Japan Version - English Subtitles)
Ashura-jo no Hitomi was based very closely on a hit kabuki stage play called Blood Gets In Your Eyes (which is my candidate for finest title ever). I found both film and play quite intriguing, and I'll talk a little about the play below.

Back to Ashura. The film opens at a broken bridge, with a haunting tune sung by the girlish Emishi, She Who Sees. Emishi and Bizan, a demon dressed as a Buddhist nun, confront Kuninari, Master of the Demon Wardens, and his lieutenant, Jaku, with the news that Ashura, the demon queen, will soon awaken.

The Demon Wardens look the part, with plenty of black leather armour and long gleaming swords. Izumo and Jaku stride about slaying demons with great verve (and much spraying of fluorescent green demon blood) and it's pretty clear that these are men who love their jobs. The mass slaughter fades into the next scene, as we see Izumo waking from the nightmare he's relived so often: killing a child in a frenzy of bloodlust. From there, we wander through an imagined Edo, one filled with demons and dark forces, as Izumo meets Tsubaki, and their story moves towards its fateful conclusion.

This is undoubtedly Ichikawa's film, just as Blood Gets In Your Eyes was Ichikawa's stage play. Izumo is a larger-than-life hero, and Ichikawa plays him high, wide, and handsome: he's an irresistible charmer with a silver tongue who sweeps Tsubaki off her feet, while at the same time flashing his sword about and buckling more swash than Errol Flynn. And it must be said that he looks damn fine in a kimono.

One of the casting surprises is Watabe, who plays Jaku. Watabe, who portrayed the gentle lover Akira in Inugami, and has appeared in many TV dramas in similarly likeable roles, shouldn't have been an ideal choice. Jaku, after all, is a relentlessly ambitious man who would happily slay anyone in his way, and sleep peacefully afterwards. But surprisingly, Watabe carries the character effortlessly. His gentle smile and soft voice work to make Jaku more threatening, and more three-dimensional, than any histrionics. And his interactions with Izumo possess an extra dimension that takes Jaku out of the realm of murderous envy into a murkier and more disturbing obsession.

Miyazawa, who co-starred in Twilight Samurai, is a fine actress who mostly holds her own against Ichikawa. She doesn't have the impact of the actress who played Tsubaki on stage, but she manages well enough. Higuchi, last seen as the sainted mother in Casshern, portrays Bizan as menacing without being overly theatrical, and thankfully she manages with a minimum of shrill maniacal laughter.

The film does have flaws. Izumo sometimes seems confused as to exactly what wounds he's sustained. Tsubaki is so painfully thin that the love scene becomes suspense, as we wonder whether her bones will snap. And just how one tiny woman constrained by kimono and zori (wooden thongs) manages to outrun two fighting demon wardens is a mystery known only to the director. But these flaws aren't insurmountable, and the film remains highly enjoyable.

The soundtrack is generally good. The demon-slaughtering theme is a great rhythmic piece oddly like celtic music, while the "Izumo going to do his tragic duty" theme is reminiscent of Garbage or Cat Power. Emishi's little song drifts through several scenes, and even the compulsory saccharine violin piece is inoffensive. The glaring exception, the one wildly out-of-place song, is that running over the end credits. Whoever thought that Sting's rendition of "My Funny Valentine" would be a great end title song really needs a good slapping. It's appalling, and completely shatters the mood.

BLOOD GETS IN YOUR EYES

I really can't talk about Ashura without mentioning the stage play. For starters, don't be put off by the word 'kabuki': there's a rich texture of tradition if you know what to look for, and if you don't, well, this is simply a stage play to western audiences.

I found the stage version even more entertaining than the film. The characters are slightly different, with Ichikawa's Izumo being less macho and more amusing. There are also several characters who don't appear at all in the film: watch for Battosai the sword-smith and a persistent princess.

The difference in the characters, particularly Izumo, may seem odd. After all, the film was made because the stage play was such a hit, so you'd expect them to stick with the winning formula. But there are things that work on stage that would be a disaster on film, and conversely. For me, the character changes worked perfectly: the stage Izumo is ideally suited to the stage, while the film Izumo works perfectly on film. This is complemented by the strength of the stage version of Tsubaki, who does much more than provide a foil for male heroics.

The stage Jaku is sterner and less three dimensional than the film Jaku, but again, this works well. Perhaps this is because the poor man's hair is even more bizarre than the film version, which is bound to make a man cranky. The stage Bizan, on the other hand, lets loose with an in-your-face demon nun prone to bouts of shrill maniacal laughter, which makes her a little difficult to take.

Overall, both film and stage play work exceedingly well, with the stage play richer in texture and character subtleties, while the film provides strong action and CGI. And of course both film and stage play are centred on Izumo, brought to full and riveting life by Ichikawa.

8.5 crimson threads of destiny out of 10

by Alison Jobling - heroic-cinema.com

This original content has been created by or licensed to YesAsia.com, and cannot be copied or republished in any medium without the express written permission of YesAsia.com.

Customer Review of "Ashura-jo no Hitomi Premium Edition (Limited Edition)(Japan Version - English Subtitles)"

Average Customer Rating for this Edition: Customer Review Rated Bad 10 - 10 out of 10 (1)

Hikaru
See all my reviews


August 23, 2005

3 people found this review helpful

A touching love story Customer Review Rated Bad 10 - 10 out of 10
I've watched this story. My English is not good but just want to translate the story introduction: In the acient Edo, there were Oni (Japanese ghost) eating human beings and aimed to destroy the human's world, they just waited for the wake up of "King of Oni--Ashura". Meanwhile, the "Bakufu"(government)just took this chance to beat down the Oni, and created a unit aimed to defeat them. In this Oni-defeat unit, Wakuraba Izumo, who was the vice-leader of the unit, and was a famous stage perfomer. He met a women called Tsubaki. However, Tsubaki had a secret, that once she fell in love with someone, she would become the "King of Oni-ashura"!!! That means she could not love anyone! But she felt herself falling in love with Wakuraba... If Tsubaki became Ashura, Wakuraba had to kill Tsubaki!! But he couldn't stop loving Tsubaki... How would Tsubaki react? Love Wakuraba and being killed by him? Or...? It is really a very touching love story!!!
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