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Seoul Station (2016) (DVD) (English Subtitled) (Hong Kong Version) DVD Region 3

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Seoul Station (2016) (DVD) (English Subtitled) (Hong Kong Version)
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YesAsia Editorial Description

Animation filmmaker Yeon Sang Ho unleashes the zombie virus in Seoul Station, the animated prequel to his box-office sensation Train to Busan. Unveiling the initial zombie outbreak that leads to the catastrophe in the live-action film, the harrowing animated horror criticizes an impotent government and different social problems. Voiced by Ryu Seung Ryong, Shim Eun Kyung and Lee Joon, the animation follows a father's search for his missing daughter during a zombie outbreak. Seoul Station was screened at the 2016 Edinburgh Film Festival and received the Silver Raven at the 34th Brussels International Fantastic Film Festival.

Seok Kyu (Ryu Seung Ryong) desperately searches for his runaway daughter Hye Sun (Shim Eun Kyung), who has become a prostitute and is now living with her feckless boyfriend Ki Woong (Lee Joon). Just before his reunion with Hye Sun, a zombie apocalypse breaks out at nearby Seoul Station, where a homeless man infected with the virus starts attacking the others. The trio struggle to survive in the undead cannibal epidemic but find themselves up against not only zombies but also armed soldiers and barricades blocking them from safety.

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Technical Information

Product Title: Seoul Station (2016) (DVD) (English Subtitled) (Hong Kong Version) 屍殺前傳:首爾站 (2016) (DVD) (香港版) 尸杀前传:首尔站 (2016) (DVD) (香港版) Seoul Station (2016) (DVD) (English Subtitled) (Hong Kong Version) 서울역
Also known as: 起源:首爾車站 起源:首尔车站
Artist Name(s): Shim Eun Kyung | Lee Joon | Ryu Seung Ryong | Kim Jae Rok 沈恩京 | 李準 | 柳承龍 | Kim Jae Rok 沈恩京 | 李准 | 柳承龙 | Kim Jae Rok シム・ウンギョン | イ・ジュン | リュ・スンリョン | キム・ジェロク 심은경 | 이준 | 류 승룡 | 김재록
Director: Yeon Sang Ho 延尚浩 延尚浩 Yeon Sang Ho 연상호
Release Date: 2017-08-04
Language: Korean
Subtitles: English, Traditional Chinese
Country of Origin: South Korea
Picture Format: NTSC What is it?
Sound Information: Dolby Digital 5.1, Dolby Digital EX(TM) / THX Surround EX(TM)
Disc Format(s): DVD
Region Code: 3 - South East Asia (including Hong Kong, S. Korea and Taiwan) What is it?
Publisher: Edko Films Ltd. (HK)
Package Weight: 100 (g)
Shipment Unit: 1 What is it?
YesAsia Catalog No.: 1061251134

Product Information

At Seoul Station after sunset, an old homeless man, one of the many, is seen as he gobbles up another. Soon, the streets around the area are covered with madmen. Hye-sun, a runaway teenager, breaks up with her boyfriend who forces her into prostitution. She leaves the shabby inn that they were staying at near the station and witnesses people being attacked. The attacked become attackers, increasing their numbers exponentially. The government declares a lock out of the entire area. The normal people run from the attackers, but without a place to run to.
Additional Information may be provided by the manufacturer, supplier, or a third party, and may be in its original language

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YumCha! Asian Entertainment Reviews and Features

Professional Review of "Seoul Station (2016) (DVD) (English Subtitled) (Hong Kong Version)"

August 2, 2017

This professional review refers to Seoul Station (DVD) (Korea Version)
Having made a name for himself as the leading voice in Korean adult animation with his blistering 2011 debut The King of Pigs and his 2013 follow-up The Fake, the award-winning Yeon Sang-ho returns with Seoul Station. This time around, Yeon marries the kind of biting social criticism that characterises his works with horror genre thrills, following a zombie outbreak in Seoul that starts with the homeless and marginalised living on the streets and under the city's station.

After opening with the death of a homeless man from a mysterious bloody bite wound, the film focuses on Hye Sun (Shim Eun-kyung, Hansel and Gretel), a young runaway prostitute living with her useless boyfriend Ki Woong (Lee Joon, TV star and former member of KPOP group MBLAQ) who keeps trying to pimp her out to make money to cover their rent. After another argument Hye Sun wanders the streets, and unfortunately finds herself caught up in the middle of an epidemic whose victims rise from the dead with a taste for human flesh, having to take shelter with a group of homeless people on the run from the ghouls. Meanwhile, Ki Woong runs into Hye Sun's father (Ryoo Seung-ryong, The Piper) who is out looking for her after receiving a tipoff from a friend, and the two desperately try to track her down as the city falls into chaos.

As with his previous films, Seoul Station sees social criticism at the forefront of Yeon Sang-ho’s mind, and though the animation is a 28 Days Later style urban zombie thriller, right from the start it's clear that there's a lot more going on. By focusing on the homeless and the ways in which they and other fringe-dwellers who have dropped out or been forced out by the system are discriminated against, rather than the usual good-looking faux-outcasts, the film has a very different feel – having a prostitute and a wretched would-be pimp as two of the main characters is certainly a statement of intent. Evoking metaphor by way of George A. Romero, Yeon's script takes a very bleak and accusatory look at Korean society, with precious little in the way of hope, and manages to do so while sidestepping many of the usual clichés, giving its themes a freshness and cutting edge, not to mention an air of anger.

This boosts what is essentially a familiar and straightforward zombie outbreak narrative, and the story does recall other recent films of its kind, with several scenes and set pieces likely to be recognisable to fans of the form. Whilst lacking in originality on this score, the film is tight, tense and fast-moving, and Yeon does manage to work in a few genuine shocks and surprises along the way, in particular with regards to his pleasingly ruthless approach to the brutal killing off of sympathetic characters. As the film progresses it becomes obvious that no one is safe, and this adds a welcome element of danger which really pays off during the final act.

As with The King of Pigs and The Fake, Yeon's style here has a rough, almost awkward look that takes a bit of time to get used to, though once the viewer is attuned it proves very effective indeed, giving the film the kind of atmospheric and grounded feel not usually seen in animation. This is to a large extent crucial to the film's success, ensuring that it retains a grittiness throughout and that it avoids ever becoming cartoonish or over the top in a way which would undermine its themes and social aims. It also helps to increase the impact of the film's gore scenes, of which it has many, Yeon going all-out with throwing in the kind of flesh eating and mauling that genre fans expect. The film definitely does work very well on this more straightforward level as well, featuring plenty of action and gruesome carnage, more than earning its stripes as a zombie flick.

Seoul Station is another great offering from Yeon Sang-ho, and though it appears the director is moving on from animation and into live action features, he has unquestionably made his mark on the form. Successful both as a dark piece of social commentary and a horror thriller, the film deserves to find an audience outside the animation crowd, and is an accomplished and exciting hour and a half of genre cinema in its own right.

by James Mudge - EasternKicks.com

This original content has been created by or licensed to YesAsia.com, and cannot be copied or republished in any medium without the express written permission of YesAsia.com.

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